About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
CNBC 29
CSPAN2 4
CNNW 3
CSPAN 3
FBC 3
KCSM (PBS) 1
KRCB (PBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 45
Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)
talking about 6,000 to talking about 5,900. the german bund rallying. same goes for the uk. we're seeing a rotation into safety, out of risk and out of spain and italy. about 4.5% for italy. thin trading in markets is exacerbating the move that we're seeing as we approach the year. today, the austy dollar is weaker against the u.s. dollar by about .4%. proxy there for global growth prospects. the dollar/yen is weaker by about .25%. this as markets digest the news out of the boj and gauge whether they'll be successful in boosting inflation ultimately. the euro/dollar, 1.3221. so for trading in asia, just how japan, china and the rest have been affected by fiscal cliff news, diedra morris is join onning us with plenty more. hi. >> hey, kelly. it was a bit of a rude awaking. a lot of these indexes were on their way to gains and then we had the fiscal cliff setback. we had news that john boehner's plan b failed. this all turned red and this is where we ended. the nikkei 225 coming back from that huge rally that we have seen over the last five weeks shedding 1%. the exporters hurt here becaus
of just 2.5% in the u.s., 1.5% in canada and zero growth in the uk. locally, cutbacks in government spending weighed on the numbers and lower commodity prices also impacted on cash flow and the government is facing more criticism about its effort to keep the budget in surplus while the economy grows. >> the government has had the objective of making sure that we would bring our budget back to surplus when growth has been around trend. what we've been seeking to do through good budget policy has been to provide maximum flexibility to the reserve bank to a just rate so. the government will always put in place appropriate budget settings which will support growth and jobs. >> still, analysts say growth could slow further as the mining investment boom peaks. yesterday, the bank of australia cut interest rates to a record low of 3% and traders are looking further easing next year to offset the falling talks of trade, the high australian daughter and further cutbacks in government spending. >> despite that prognosis for rates and the fact that we're now matching the record lows here, the
prices to next year. it will be oil related, a chance, good job with raising the tax threshold in the uk. that means for the first year in five. uk link will be up, not down. and them i also think thattory thing our chancellor did a good job of was she raised taxes by 10 so companies can invest a 215 pounds, not just 200 pounds. >> that's a leverage the other governments have been trying to pull. but your point is interesting. it's not just the uk we were seeing there. and it goes back to the point you were making about oil. u.s. retail gas prices are down 16% since their peak this year. if it weren't for the fiscal cliff, this is actually a big source of stimulus for households. absolutely. i don't want to make too much about it, but the biggest attacks oeft with the and elevated since the mid '70s, it could be coming to an end. so i think that is something we need to be aware of. the annual fuel rate in the uk is about 15 billion to consumers. you're looking at another percent on income. so as i'm sitting down righting the income for next year, it's not all doom and gloom, the mood is
'll take a look at gilts. slightly lower, 1.77%. big day for uk. manufacturing pmis out for the month of november. italian and ten year sbpanish yields are also lower. down on the greek announcements, but substantially below 6%. ten year bunds 1.37%. those yields slightly higher. on the currency markets, we talked about this euro-dollar six week high. below that at the moment, but not by much. dollar-yen moving off the 7 1/2 month high at 82.17. aussie dollar weaker despite the good chinese data. dipping below 1.04 earlier on. we had retail sales data that was a little bit disappointing. sterling-dollar back above 1.60 as we wait for the pmis. the most searched terms apparently of 2012 were the u.s. election and iphone 5. and while the most searched person of the year was kim kardashian, this is according to yahoo! search engine, kate middleton and political polls also made the top ten list. so here is a simple question for you today. what dunk were the most interesting stories this year or the most interesting story, the election, the owe almost picks, the ongoing saga in greece. let
by steady though horrendously slow upturn. the british economy, however, is profoundly stuck. the u.k. has been put on negative watch on three largest credit rating agencies. the european union is britain's largest trading partner, europe's economy remains on prepares you footing despite several months of relative calm and there's a growing debate abt whher e u.k should lead the e.u. earlier this month we covered the "economist" magazine read "good-bye europe, look what happened when britain left the e.u. " i'm pleased to have george osborne back on this program and back at this table. >> thank you very much. >> rose: you're in new york city for a speech at the manhattan institute. >> i did that last night and had some meetings on wall street, seeing them there later. >> rose: so what's your message about the british economy to manhattan institute as well as the mayor and wall street? >> well, the basic message is itaiis on for business. if you want to come and invest in a country that is dealing with its problems, cutting its business taxes, providing opportunities for companys to go brit
, relatively flattish trade, as well. the yield here on the spanish yield, 5.3%. the uk seeing yeldz slightly higher, as well. but, of course, it is christmas. it is the holiday season that we're up against. so you would anticipate that maybe some investor res closing out recent profits. sitting tight and waiting for that next year to start, karen. >> thanks very much, louisa. we are indeed in a festive mood. let me echo a very merry christmas to the viewers out there. on the agenda in the united states, there's no economic earnings start to go speak of this christmas eve. the markets will be closing early with the nyse and nasdaq depending at 1:00 p.m. eastern, the cme at 1:15 and the nymex at 1:30. the cme will close up shop at 1:45 eastern. u.s. investors get the monthly case-shiller home price index on thursday wednesday. thursday, it's jobless claims, new home sales and consumer confidence. friday, we round out on the week with the chicago pmi pending home sales. interesting to see the level of volume that we had in u.s. markets on friday. it was 4.8 billion shares traded. the fourth lig
if it weren't for the ipad, the uk sales figures would be extraordinarily weak. >> yes. although, you know, for the uk economy, the consumer sector is not the weakest point. i think what is interesting about the uk economy in the last six months is this quite stronger than expected growth. if you look at the gdp number. but a very worrisome trend. so a liberal market that remains very, very firm with respect to other similar economic weakness. and i think that is what we really have to solve on the uk economy to know if this relativerelativ relatively soft, but also, i mean, rather encouraging if you look at other european countries numbers. i think we will have to wait until well into next year to understand if this is going to have a long-lasting consequences on the uk economy and also on the consumer sector. it's too early to say. >> you mentioned it's not necessarily the consumer where we're looking at the gauge of growth in the uk. but we see the employment figures be relatively strong even at a time when gdp generally is weak. what's the disconnect between what we're seeing in the em
july, 2011. up .5%. yields coming down during the session yesterday. employment numbers out of the u.k. in around 15 minutes or so. we'll keep our eyes on that. yields also -- treasury yields, 1.67%. gild yields, 1.63. and bond yields higher. they got kicked higher in germany post that survey which we broke on the show, as well. as far as the currency market, dollar bit under pressure ahead of the fed. euro/dollar 130.08. we were down late friday and early monday trade, as well. dollar/yen, highs polls suggest mr. erbe will be a clear win in japan. however big will the lead be and what influence tell have on the bank of japan. dollar and yen pressured by more q.e. talk. and aussillar three-month high. the prospect of q.e. boosting commodityets. canadian doing well. firm at 1.6122. we have more on the asian trading day out of singapore. >> reporter: hi, thank you, ross. most asian markets finished on a bright note. the shanghai composite recouped morning losses in positive territory. property stocks turned higher in the afternoon. stocks also rallied while investors await beijing's det
export performance, creating jobs in the manufacturing sector. but germany and the uk need europe to improve. >> it comes at an inkrd eblly high cost in terms of the number of people out of work. what has been done? how much have we destroyed so that the jobs outlook and growth prospect in this country? >> well, what growth prospect in the southern european countries? we're seeing definitive bifurcation of northern europe and southern europe. southern europe, we are creating an underclass of long-term, especially youth unemployed that is going to give us a problem when the economies eventually start to get into balance and start to pick up. we still have this issue, even though we have tens of millions of people out of work, we still can't find the right skills and the right time. >> you mentioned the uk. the unemployment picture never got that bad in britain. so what happens now? why did it outperform? >> the uk is so different from the rest of europe. we've got london, the financial services sector, that didn't actually, in terms of job numbers, get hit as hard as the rest of eu
in ubs have edged up in early trade after the bank announced a major settlement with u.s., u.k., and swiss regulators over its role in the libor fixing scandal. with more we'll look at the story with carolyn roth with us on set. i guess we're expecting a settlement, expecting something big. what have we learned today? >> well, first of all, i mean, the market reaction -- ubs up by 1%, can you believe that? what barclays was hit with $450 million fine, i mean, we saw a big hit in barclays' share price. this fine is three time the amount that barclays was fined. $1.5 billion or $1.4 billion swiss>>frank: francs. this is on the libor manipulation charges. ubs must pay swiss regulators $59 million in profits because the regulator can't fine ubs. the fine from the fsa is the biggest ever, 160 million pounds, $1.2 billion will go to the u.s. regulators. so the second biggest fine that was ever handed to a financial institution. of course, following that $1.9 billion fine that was given to hsbc. what we do know is that the company is admitting criminal wrongdoing in its japanese arm b
ourses to our international competitors, our economy here in the uk is growing by 0.6%, whereas in germany, we've seen growth of 3.6%. in the u.s., growth of #.1% during the same period. so certainly not a cause for celebration. still a difficult operating environment. under the former chancellor's plan, we would have been borrowing less in the next three years. because the government has failed to get our economy growing and because the policies have pushed us into recent double dip recession, they'll be pr rowing 212 billion pounds more than they planned. put that in context, that is the equivalent of what we in the uk will be spending this financial year on health, transport and defense in aggregate. >> you were talking quite rightly about the low level of he have credit growth in the uk, which has obviously been a feature of this period. but there's a question of what's cause and what's effect there. the banks will tell you that that problem is not so much availability of credit, there's credit demand and even in the mortgage sector which under normal circumstances you might
very cautious trading. we have industrial production coming out of the uk. if worse than expected, may get a negative q4 for the uk. italian yields are higher. spanish 5.54, just nudging a little higher. bunds down 1.29d% after the downgrade by the bundesbank, as well. draghi says we discussed it and again a big town great in inflation forecast, as well. some saying maybe they still won't, but it does knock the euro-dollar, 1.29d 25 is where we stand. dollar-yen 82.37. we talked about the yen in relation to what was going on with the earthquake. aussie dollar below 1.05. sterling-dollar just slightly weaker. that's where we stand as far as the european markets are concerned. let's get a wrap of the final trading day in asia this week. >> asian markets wrapped up the week on a mixed note. shanghai composite gained 1.6% and it's up over 4% on the week. stocks related to citi growth continued to surge as the new urbanization plan is aiming to boost investment plan. agriculture stocks up today on support policies. hang seng dragged lower by utility stocks. picc staged a strong trading debu
to allow the ecb to directly supervisor the three largest banks in each country except for the uk and sweden which have both opted out. european leaders need to give their seal of approval and silvia wadhwa is in brussels with the latest. sylvia, it sounds like the meeting went into the late hours of the night. it sounds like the uk and sweden got their way. how significant is this agreement? >> the early hours of the morning. one may wonder whether that's good news for sweden and the uk that they opted out of the banking supervision or whether that's good news for them in that sense that they opted out and had their way. bottom line is, we have an agreement. that's the most important thing. otherwise, they threaten meetings going between the years leading up to christmas because everybody agrees that we might have a type of agreement before the year is out. the agreement that is on the table, ecb will be the banking supervisor. the straightforward ecb supervisory council will be flanked by two other committees, a mediation committee and a steering committee. the personnel of this
us is allen higgins, chief investment officer for the uk coutts. good morning. >> good morning. >> so we've had 12 years of exposure to gold. you're limiting it now. why? >> it's starting to lag, but more subtly from a portfolio construction perspective, it's lost its negative correlation. for example, quarter 2010, well, euro crisis won when we had equity markets down a lot then gold really surged forward, giving a negative correlation. and so for the portfolio manager at coutts, it has been at times a legal high gold exposure surging upwards in times of stress. for those days seem to have gone. trimming it. that is a fact that there's a real shortage of low risk investments of on german bunch negative. >> but you're saying it's trading like other risk assets at the moment. >> at times, it's correlated with em. so it's less attractive from a portfolio construction perspective as compared to what it was. >> it's fascinating because we've been talking about one theme for 2013 being is it a stock picker's market, are we seeing less differentiation, what you're saying would suggest that
in a very bad way for the royal prank played by some foolish people. >> demonstrators are urging the uk to release the body of saldanha who was of indian origin so her family can perform final rites. they are also demanding efforts by authorities to look into the cause of the incident. >> we are joined here to pray for jacintha's family. a proper investigation has to be done. it is a major issue. it can't be left as it is. >> two australian radio deejays impersonated queen elizabeth ii in a recorded call which was later aired on a sydney radio station. the two hosts have since been taken off the air. following the incident, an independent organization has started an investigation into ethical standards in the media. that will wrap up our bulletin for today. i'm patchari raksawong in bangkok. >>> politicians in japan have one more day to get their messages out to voters. they've been campaigning ahead of the country's first general election in three years. the ruling democrats came to power in 2009, promising change. but the former ruling liberal democrats say the party hasn't delivered.
for the royal prank played by some foolish people. >> demonstrators are urging the uk to release the body of saldanha who was of indian origin so her family can perform final rites. they are also demanding efforts by authorities to look into the cause of the incident. >> we are joined here to pray for jacintha's family. a proper investigation has to be done. it is a major issue. it can't be left as it is. >> two australian radio deejays impersonated queen elizabeth ii in a recorded call which was later aired on a sydney radio station. the two hosts have since been taken off the air. following the incident, an independent organization has started an investigation into ethical standards in the media. that will wrap up our bulletin for today. i'm patchari raksawong in bangkok. >>> politicians in japan have one more day to get their messages out to voters. they've been campaigning ahead of the country's first general election in three years. the ruling democrats came to power in 2009, promising change. but the former ruling liberal democrats say the party hasn't delivered. and so japan decide
irish fan, so hopefully not. >> is dolmen all over the uk? >> that's correct. they're predominantly in ireland, but you look at ireland right now, they're actually going through the reforms. they're trying to inject money in a credit fashion into their economy. and we certainly think we can bring our fixed income expertise and continue to help them. >> that would make sense for cantor. ireland was the mf-will first they were in trouble, then the model for the world. what got them into trouble again, housing or real estate or something or bad banks or -- and now again they're kind of a model for everyone on how to handle it. is that basically the last five years? >> absolutely. certainly was a real estate bubble there. now there are austerity measures being put in place and they're actually following through on the austerity measures. so certainly they'll come out first and actually look pretty good. >> so where is the most business for you for cantor in ireland, what will you be doing? >> certainly it's an equity based firm. we'll bring our fixed income expertise, probably become th
. as you can see there, the uk gilt is telling offer a little bit. yield riding to 1.78%. whether it's the bund or even yields in spain are falling as prices rise a little bit. so there is light at the end of the tunnel according to our next guest. he says the global economy is close to reaching its weakest point before recovery sets in. he's robert cohen, chief equity strategist. woke. >> good morning. >> we just heard rob doddson talking through some of these results. unfortunately, we saw some signs of weaker demand, especially global demand in these reports. but perhaps what is consistent with what you're saying, why is it your view that that is going to happen? >> sometimes you need to pull away. you move away from the fundamentals a little bit on the month to month improvements. if you look at 2013 as a whole, the big headwinds you've had in a number of years, fiscal austerity is largely the sarp in europe year on year. 2014, that comes up quite quickly. 2013 is largely going to be the final year of the crushing deleveraging if you like on the european banks. so essentially the
as analysts cut their outlook for the uk power group. >> okay. welcome. it's the start of a brand new week here on "worldwide exchange." and don't adjust your set, kelly and i are together. >> for once, for a day. >> but make the most of it because it won't be lasting. >> if only there were a slo-mo. >> i'm going to enjoy as much as i can of today. >> and likewise. and then we're going to have to get all of our u.s. voouers to find cnbc world because they could get three hours of you, carol and carolin for the rest of the week. >> whatever they can do. record it and fast forward to the good bits. >> yeah. >> it will be 2:00, 3:00 in the morning or whatever. >>> on today's show, plenty to come on. >> yes. the south american union faces ejection from the imf for allegedly cooking its books about the innation rate. we'll head out to europe where the swiss banking giants could be facing $1.6 billion over libor rate rigging allegations. >> and we'll be on the floor in beijing where china's leaders just wrapped up a major conference. >>> and japan's prime minister election is calling on the bank
all closed in europe. only the uk, french, dutch and spanish stock markets are open and they're going to be closing early. there are now only five trading sessions left in 2012. get your act together. stocks and bonds, solid gains so far this year. the dow has advanced 8% in total. the s&p 500 up almost 14%. the nasdaq has jumped 16%. it's been a good year. the end of the year also means we are just days away from the fiscal cliff, however, and that's the bad news. and looming tax hikes, spending cuts, all of that. both sides warning a very big deal becoming a bit more unlikely. >> and my one bit of advice to speaker boehner is this. you cannot pass a bill with just republicans. on a broad thing like this, you need both. and he has put himself with plan b and sort of an impossible position. he has to get these hard right goes to go along with him. and he and the president were going to say we're going to pass a deal with the majority of republicans and the majority of democrats in the house and senate, we would get a mainstream deal. >> i think we're going to fall out of the fiscal tr
over next send. that cnooc would be allowed to do it. it needs u.s. and u.k. government approval as well. because they have nexen has significant assets in both nations. they also at the same time, canada approving a $5.25 billion deal proposed by malaysia petroleum in bid for progress energy. canada selling off assets to two state-owned entities. cnooc deal liable to get a little bit of attention here as well i'm sure, melissa. melissa: very much so. robert, thanks so much. >>> moving on we picked up on an interesting idea to solve the debt crisis. here it is. have the government mint two platinum coins and assign them a value of trillion dollars each. deposit the coins directly into the federal reserve, boom like magic we're $2 trillion away from hitting debt ceiling. under the current law this is perfectly legal. our "money" power panel is back to discuss economist peter morici. jonathan hoenig from capitalist pig.com and ian shepherd son from pantheon macro advisors. guys, what do you think? this is serious idea out there being float the around. we have the peterson institute
are required to pay less obviously in u.k. pounds. english homeowners are required to pay those back, but the u.s. institutional investors who purchased that they're based on have to pay their obligations, that is u.s. pensioners and other investors in funds have to pay those back in u.s. dollars. as such, the u.k. securitize her will turn three basic currency swap to effectively protect investors from any currency fluctuations in buying the securitization. that way the english homeowner gets their mortgage in u.k. pounds, but ultimately the institutional investor can focus on the credit and prepayment risk of the securities rather than currency fluctuations. historically this has been a challenge and there's been little interaction between cftc in securitization. rule changes and proposals have unfortunately created significant concern for securitization markets. first, posting a cash margin may be required for securitization for the most basic vanilla types. poor regulations may trip up in rope in many securitization transactions into those rules. first let me address briefly the gas margin.
with the libor rate fixing scandal. libor rate is used to set rates on loans. three arrests out of the uk right now. >>> u.s. stock futures higher. fiscal cliff talks, federal reserve meeting in washington, two drivers for investments over the next couple of days. futures holding in there for now. >>> federal and state authorities have reached a record-setting settlement with british banking giant hsbc. europe's largest lender has agreed to a staggering settlement. this is a big fine. hsbc is accused of helping transfer billions formations like iran doing business with firms linked to terrorism and also enabling mexican drug cartels to move money illegally through u.s. subsidiaries. >> considering that, that sounds low, $2 mibillion for helping mexican drug cartels and terrorists out of iran? >>> and asia asending, the west in decline. 300 years of the west rising is reversing. american intelligence agencies are preparing this report that they do every four years for incoming administration. the world undergoing tectonic shifts, comparable to the french revolution and industrial revolution, but
of u.k. and europe equivalent to ashburn and the buildings in the u.s.. and i know that in particular because the two cables down the east coast of africa does have their major hubs, their major nodes at telehouse in london. from their it's a straight shot to the landing place, again a fascinating place partly because it's in the same spot as the ancient port. this is always the place where the international -- >> host: andrew blum were and where these undersea cables that you refer to lade and by whom? >> guest: while there have been telegraph cables across the atlantic for 150 years now. the current generation of cables, pledged it depends on how you count, the individual strands or cable systems ,-com,-com ma sometimes two or even three individual strands, there are 10 or some say 12 of them across the atlantic. the current generation was all laid since the broadband boom in the mid-90s and the first was finished and 90 7-up until about 2002 when the last one was that and they are owned by a few different kinds of companies. they are all owned either by very large backbone companie
at a situation where governments, just like in the uk, have to come one a support mechanism to make that economically viable. so i think that's going to be the saying across the world. that is quite expensive here in europe. i don't necessarily see europe as a whole changing its mind and going from nuclear. if you take germany, for example, why did they change their mind? obviously, there were safety concerns but probably more importantly, it was to do with the ballot box. there was quite a bit of opposition, people out on the streets protesting and in the end of the days, the politicians decided to take what i considered to be a political course rather than an economic one. >> i don't think we would describe it as positively rosy just yet. we're saying that the storm clouds are listing. but as you're hinting, there are big question marks about growth in 2013, particularly in the euro area where we're not expecting very much more than a flat economy at best. key thing for the investment markets, as you know, is that gdp growth is only a small part of the story. a lot depends on what
in case. tests beginning in the uk for the first unmanned airplane flights. called jet stream. won't be carrying any passengers for now. >> i would say that's a good idea. >> think about it driverless cars. if you can have the car talk to the computer and the gps, satellite and program the coordinates and all pretty standard and clear, you can control congestion and the like. a lot of companies, including the agriculture companies, working on tractors and such have wen working on this a long, long time. >> can they drive stick? >> i don't know. that's a really john berman question. >> seems spooky to me. >> and glitches, right? always seeing glitches in technology. that's worry some. >> a lot of glitches in human driving. >> that's true. >>> 19 minutes past the hour right now the big bucks in the board room aren't what they used to be. the latest pay trend in corporate america, coming up. [ male announcer ] you are a business pro. monarch of marketing analysis. with the ability to improve roi through seo all by cob. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choos
, the euro moving higher still under 130. the uk pound moving higher. the dollar down against all these currencies. we will be right back. >> 20 minutes past the hour, this is your fox news minutes. a navy seal dead after u.s. and nato operation could not a doctorate in eastern afghanistan. a member of the seal team six elite unit known to take out usama bin laden. the ducks american was safely removed after being held by the taliban. egyptian government reportedly allow the military to arrest civilians. the move is an attempt to safeguard the constitutional referendum for saturday. the order was to protect violence temporarily until the referendum resulted. manufacturing has been hit hard because of u.s. sanctions. facing financial crisis in the last four years. dissuading the nation from continuing uranium enrichment. those are your headlines. back to ashley. ashley: thank you very much. holiday sales hitting record numbers, but even an upbeat shopping season won't be the saving grace for some retailers so what does that mean for your portfolio? sandra smith has a look at the wi
the key here. 31 daily nonstop flights. that's all part of what goes between the uk and north america for virgin atlantic. the brand remains, guys. make that clear here. the virgin atlantic brand does not go away. what changes is that delta has a 49% stake in the company. there's going to be a press conference later this morning here in new york. we're going to be talking with delta ceo richard anderson, and "squawk on the street" a little later on this morning. but this is a big deal in terms of what's happening with the airlines, and that international consolidation that we've all been expecting. guys, back to you. >> before you go, real quick. how much is this going to really impact delta, singapore air, which had this stake, was unhappy ultimately, because they didn't have the control that they really needed. or thought that they needed. >> i think richard anderson believes he will have the control. also singapore airlines, many believe that it did not utilize the access to heathrow as effectively as delta will be able to in terms of flights between north america, and heathrow. so
're not being impacted at this stage. we are in the france, uk and spain and all of our businesses are growing in each market. we're hiring in all of those markets. anybody who wants to know. >> have you changed the mix of samples depending on the economic environment? for instance in 2008 did you have maybe a lower end price point product as well as a higher end or no? >> that's one thing about the beauty industry, trends are always changing. it's an accessible luxury. you've heard of the lipstick effect. when the company goes down people want to treat themselves. one thing we've seen this year is male trends. nail polish, nail art. >> carl loves nail polish. he just loves it. >> what are all those people who give out samples in department stores going to do when you put them out of business? >> they're doing something different. department store sampling and sampling in stores is a loyalty moment. it's not a great thing to do for customer acquisition. you still have to get a customer to walk up to you. we're doing something really different. it's customer acquisition and it's in a very targe
is set to open below 13,000. markets in europe mixed after a shortened session in the uk, france and spain. our road map starts right where we were months ago, waiting for the 112th congress to agree on a debt reduction package. the senate convenes at 11:00 a.m. >> the dow had its worst day in a month on friday. set to close december with a loss. the question is, does it continue to sell off if there isn't an accord in congress. >> we will always have china. manufacturing pmi data from last night is the best in 21 months. can we finally say the chinese economy has been stabilized. >> but of course, we start in washington. as you know, congress comes back today. the house gaveling into session now with legislative business starting at 10:00 a.m. the senate returns at 11:00 a.m. eastern. there are only a few hours left to get a deal done. eamon? >> you're already hearing people talk the way they talk on new year's day. a lot of people wish they could go back in time and do things differently. that's the way people are talking in washington about this fiscal cliff. feeling as if thi
that will get smaller and smaller and smaller. the uk, well under 2. china, 1.55. we know they've actually implemented policies because they want to control population. in the bigger picture, fooling around with mother nature in this way could have hugely negative consequences. russia 1.43 and germany, 1.41. at the very bottom of the list, other than certain countries where the information is not available, the bottom of this list was singapore at .78. i know we're dealing with so many issues nowadays and i blow a gasket over many of them, whether fiscal cliff, unfunded liabilities, at some point, growth is the answer. when you start considering where the engines of growth have been and what their population declines may be, it makes one wonder, where is the horsepower from global growth will come from and this at some point needs to affect the picks in your stock portfolio. back to you. >> rick, i'll take it from you, rick santelli. >>> even starbucks is worried about the fiscal cliff. and we'll take you live to one of those location as they launch their initiative. back in two. to live a
when it came out almost two years ago. we said that the uk consolidation would fail. it had too much revenue. as we are seeing now, millionaires and billionaires are heading for the exit. that is what we are going to see. >> thank you. mr. chairman, i yield back. >> i would like to congratulate the chairman on his election and the fine work he has done as chairman of this committee and to congratulate mr. brady on being selected as his chair of this committee and the next congress. for our distinguished witnesses, they agreed that what we need to do is have a long-term solution. i would like to ask dr. zandi how we achieve that. we are several million dollars apart from the president's proposal. how would you close that gap? outline the president's proposal and speaker boehner's proposal. how can we get people employed and move our economy forward? >> i apologize. there will be a fair amount of numbers here. the president's tax revenue proposal amounts to about $1.6 trillion over a 10-year period. that is from higher tax rates. roughly 600 billion are from some kind of tax reform. th
, and even in the european countries, especially the uk, they have a one-payer system, but what happened is that one-payer system has caused long lines, health care is delayed getting to people, and the end result, the private sector that actually is formed. we as an organization are a big believer that the integration of care into a more -- a simpler mod'll it's under one roof or enabled in a society that can access care at single point and then be able to use it across the platform as a whole. we're not a big believer in a governmental sponsored only plan because it does not encourage innovation and does not encourage competitive aspects, and we think the competitive aspects will only make us better going forward. >> bruce, question slightly off the topic. being a texas a&m guy, what do you think of johnny manziel ask do you think can win the heisman? >> i have to tell you, the school is making me proud. the year i have been associated with texas a&m, i've never seen a better football team and i think he will win. a little off topic. >> mr. broussard, i want to comment and give you som
. concerns over the uk economy. so we'll see how investors take to what's probably going to be a loosening up of the budget targets the chancellor set when they came into power. so we'll keep our eyes on that. and at the moment today, more talks in brussels. the greeks now getting their buy back program approved 37 trying to sort out a single supervisor. i think these talks will be fairly tricky because there is a majority who bt with a tant the be supervisor for all the banks. german didn't like that. so those talks will go on longer than originally hoped. but we are marginally higher going to the u.s. open. thank you. >> kelly, thank you. i'll just call you r kelly in now. >> that's not bad. >> ross, thank you. great to see you. >>> when we come back on squawk, bank of america ceo brian moynihan in his own words, we caught up with him yesterday to talk about business, the economy and the looming figure. as we head into a break, bank of america, best performing dow component of the year. up about 77%. ♪ [ male announcer ] how could switchgrass in argentina, change engineering in dubai, alu
territory. so we're firmly in recession here in the eurozone and in the uk as well. we saw services pmi come in weaker than expected. contraction territory for new orders -- this is the british chancellor today. george osbourne will be delivering his autumn statement where he's probably going to say growth isn't strong enough so we're going to not really meet our budget targets as well. all these things coming into play at the moment as we wait for the u.s. session. we did have a good piece of news, though, out of china. the new leadership saying wle do whatever it takes to maintain solid economic growth. the shanghai composite up nearly 3% today. that boosted retail stocks. we also had a spanish bond auction, prefunding for 2013. got nearly the 4.5 billion they wanted. yields in spain. the ten-year did come lower on that auction, so not a bad result. and bid to cover was okay. so spanish yields slightly higher after that. didn't raise the maximum amount. that's where we stand. it's another cautious day under way in europe. back to you guys. >> might get my haircut like hers, ross. you know,
encrusted ipad 2? that's right. two generations old. from the uk's stewart hughes. just $8 million. still too practical? check out this diamond encrusted blackberry bold for $1.2 million. to be fair i'm not sure they're selling that one anymore, carl. >> the 10 is still coming. maybe you can modify it for the 10. that is fabulous. take me back to the television. i assume it's only as good as the input you give it, right? if you play a standard dvd it is going to look like a standard dvd? >> that's right. it'll upscale blue ray and sony gives you a server with 10 4-k movies preloaded. it loans that out to people who buy the tv. >> all right. now the robot. did i hear you right? your face appears on the forehead? >> yeah. it's a little kind of a cross between fun and creepy. you can talk to the robot. see the person's face. >> definitely on the creepy. >> it's kind of fun to try to steer it around and, you know, i got to steer it myself when i visited the
to stay profitable going forward. aggreko, this is a power generator supplier here in the uk, down 15% after it was talking about the outlook for 2013. more muted than what certainly people had been expecting. and holcim, the world's biggest cementmaker, it's reinvesting, taking write-downs and charges in its fourth quarter in order to cut operations in most of the of its european operations down 1.3%. certainly not as much as adegreeso, but kind of a da room ter. i want to turn now to forex, show you what's happening with the euro first. over here, as you can see, we're down about .3%. that's consistent with what we're seeing across bourses. bond not all that interesting today. a bit of a mixed bag. and i'll end here, guys, on, of course, the dollar/yen. japan did have when aer being called transformative actions weekend. it still remains toes be seen whether shinzo abe is going to be the next prime minister. can it help spur the company back towards growth? remember, with currencies, it's all relative and there are a lot of other players around the world who are trying to weaken the
, italy, france and the uk. this comes one day after a federal judge denied a request by apple to ban u.s. sales of samsung smart phone models. the devices in questions are the ones that a jury back in august say illegally used apple technology. at that time apple had been awarded $1.1 billion in damages. >>> the markets, dow looks like it will open up about $68 points higher. s&p up about 10 points, the nasdaq up 22.5 points coming on some of this news that we may be getting closer on the fiscal cliff. let's check out what's going on in asia. hang seng was down off marginally. shanghai composite up marginally and the nikkei up as well. quickly in europe, you can take a look at what's going on there. the ftse up about 0.38%. cac flat, and the german dax up about 0.5. >> the white house is proposing a new deal to avoid the fiscal cliff. let's get to steve liesman with more of the details. >> you're surprised, aren't you? >> isn't it happening. >> soon as they want it done they can do it. >> you said it this morning. it's a fictitious thing. we're going to show you the movement in just a
. and pervasive, they call it manipulation of libor by dozens of staff. the penalty was agreed to with u.s., u.k., and swiss regulators. it is more than three times the $450 million fine that was levied on barclays in june. the second largest fine ever on a paid -- paid by a bank. it only was topped by the $1.9 billion penalty that hsbc agreed to last week to settle that money laundering probe. >> crazy thing that stock's up. it's leading the exchange there today because people had been expecting maybe a slightly higher fine even than that. three times the amount. it was supposedly taking place for five to seven years, 30 to 40 traders have left. pretty pervasive. >> i wonder how much they -- they make money or lose money after -- >> after all was said and done. $1.5 billion. >> probably lost. they did well. the libor stuff, if you can set rates -- >> well, and the crazy thing, it affects so many different instruments and so many people and so many businesses. >> right. >> i don't know that you could ever actually figure out all the implications from it. >> right. from everyone. and in a related
look particularly appealing here, due in part to signs of resilience in u.k. gdp growth. so we've had the european close. meantime, bob joins me here at post nine with a look at not just europe but what we're doing here state side. >> sort of moving sideways and consolidating. a little news on night capital. just got off the phone with tommy joyce, who is now the executive chairman. take a look at night here. remember the deal. they've sold. they sold to geico here. a rather complicated deal. a two-to-one cash to ratio stock. again, i did talk to tommy. he said he'll be working there on a daily basis. none of these absent chairman things. he's going to be a hands-on guy. certainly a relief to everyone. everyone wants tommy joyce involved in their business. dan coleman will be spending half his time in chicago and half his time in jersey city. very interesting dynamic going on here. sort of a working partnership between the two of them. tommy insisted to me this is a complementary merger. that is true. given it's $720 million or so, how are you going to pay for it? are they going to se
the british ambassador's convoy, prompting the uk to close its mission. senators questioned how much more the state department needed to see before officials realized they didn't have enough security. >> we've got to close this facility because we can't protect american personnel in benghazi. >> reporter: the report also condemned communication failures. like the fact the head of the military's africa command didn't even know about the 2 dozen cia personnel stationed nearby. senators argued if the pentagon had the resources to respond faster, perhaps the military could have helped fight off the second attack on the cia annex. which cape hours after the first. >> we should have sufficient personnel, ships, weapons and other assets available, to be able to respond in the course of several hours. >> reporter: the report essentially orders intelligence agencies to look beyond terrorist organizations when assessing threats. it recommends intel officials, quote, broaden and deep be their focus in libya and beyond on nascent extremist groups in the region. and perhaps the most damning indictment
, even though the u.k. is kicking and screaming because they specialize in being the home of trading, whether trading in stocks or derivatives or anything else. they simply do not want that to be taxed. there are people in congress. i think wall street is now the number-one contributor to political campaigns. at least, it is in the running for number-one. i have been to washington many times and i'm involved with several groups that are trying to reform the business sector so that it can work, so that it can survive. it is very difficult because of the sheer amount of money that the finance sector in particular is pouring into lobbying and campaign contributions. it is very difficult. >> let's give a round of applause for lin. -- lynn. [applause] there is an opportunity for you to purchase and have the but signed. if you have court-further questions, she will be here signing books. thank you all and have a safe trip home. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> all this month we have been talking with retirin
of the capitol. he was a tour guide he showed me the shoeshine boy and says u.k. and 25 cents but if you can afford you give him a tip. there's a parlor shop, the bank, and then he took the on the floor and said that's where i sit. that's where you will sit. someday you'll sit there, by the chairman. and then i addressed mr. speaker and i will address you as the gentleman from hawaii. i will be damned if i'm going to call you by your name since i can't pronounce it. [laughter] and we got to be good friends. he invited me to the texas table because we had no hawaii table in the dining room. and the chicago fellows and pennsylvania fellows and new york fellows were all good to me. >> like your colleague, daniel akaka and former transportation chairman norman, world war ii was important in the event in their lives and in your life as well. you serve in the most highly decorated unit in the history of the united states army and received a bronze star, distinguished service cross and middle of honor. can you tell us what you learned from that experience, and how did that experience impact your pu
. that is what we have to worry about because we already see this happening. we also see in the u.k. that there are people being arrested. .t may be nasty stuff turning around, after the levison inquiry, regulating media. where is speech? this is a dangerous stance we are about to go under here. there is a fight over the effort to make google pay for the link.. if you can do that for media, maybe you can do it for bloggers like me. there is danger there. in dubai, they refused to have a favor of having the right on line. instead, they ordered the introduction of a firmly worded press release. speech is in danger this year. facebook is a place where we can share and can act. it is going wrong -- a round. i urge you to recognize that we must not only get enamored with new tools and toys. we have an obligation to protect the freedom. share and can act. we must protect the net. [applause] >> the phrase rock star is thrown around a lot. i am happy to welcome a bonafide rock star, amanda plummer is best known as one half of the dresden dolls. she started releasing solo albums produced by
Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)